Kandanar Kelan theyyam

Kandanar Kelan theyyam

Kandanar Kelan theyyam   is the tying theyam in Payyannur and Thaliparam parts. A woman named Meladathu Chakki belonging to the Theiya community, who was a landlord in the area called Kunnuru in Ramantali near Payyannur, got a baby boy from her place in the forest called Poompunam in Wayanad.

Kandanar Kelan theyyam

They named him Kelan and raised him as their own son. Kelan’s intelligence and vigor, who grew up to be healthy, brought happiness to that mother. His industriousness helped them to get good yields in their farms. The Kunnuru region, which was under Chakkiamma’s rule, became prosperous due to Kelan’s skill. She felt that her land in Wayanad should also be made arable, so she called Kelan and told her about it. Four forests according to mother’s wordsKelan went out with tools, his bow and spears to clear the thicket consisting of mukkutikat, muvarukunn, nalla tenga, karimbanakad)

Kandanar Kelan theyyam

Kndanar Kelan theyyam

As he was going, he took as much of the stone he had at home and drank as much as he could, and he continued his journey with one stick of stone in his hand and another in his bag to drink on the way. Kelan reached Poombun and cut down all the four forests. In the middle of the fourth flower there was a rice plant. Kellan wasn’t the only one cutting it. Then Kellan Poompunam started setting fire to all four.

Kandanar kelan Theyyam | തീയ്യിൽ വെന്ത് മരിച്ച കണ്ടനാർ കേളൻ തെയ്യം

 

He set fire to the four corners and four corners of the forest and jumped out of the middle of it with great adventure. Jumping out of the two forests like that, he later found it fun. After the third blossom he came to the fourth, where the rice-tree stood; The fourth was also set on fire. Agni and Vayu were angry, and flames spread from eight directions, higher than a keel could jump. Seeing that only the rice paddy tree was safe, Kelan jumped on top of it. Two snakes named Kali and Karaliya lived on top of that rice paddy tree. Seeing Kelan, the two snakes rushed towards Kelan’s body in fear of death. Kelan called his mother and cried. Nagas were carved on the left shoulder and right shoulder of Kelan. Kelana and the Nagas fell into the fire, they were consumed by the fire and they became ashes.

Kandanar Kelan theyyam

Wayanatukulavan, who came by after his usual hunt, saw Kelan lying in bed with two cobras on his back. The god struck the water with his hind leg. Kelan stood up holding the back leg of the god. Reincarnated with two snakes on his back, Kelan became the child of God. Wayanatukulavan blessed Kelan. “Because of what I have seen, you will be known as Kandanar Kelan” and ordered him to sit on his left side with a pedestal, weapon in hand and puja.
First the Vellatam is tied and then the full form is tied.

Kandanar Kelan theyyam

The dark black mystic eyes of the Theyam dancer are accentuated by the deep bloody red color of his face. The light of the fire reflects on his bare chest, which is decorated with the drawing of two snakes. A necklace glitters around Velli’s neck, a universal energy vibrates, the rhythm of which is transmitted to the bracelets on his arms and ankles. The narrator is ready to jump into the fire and tells his Theyam story…

Kandanar Kelan theyyam

 

About Theyam

Theyam ceremonial temple art form
Theyam or Theiyattam or Thira is a popular Hindu form of worship in North Malabar, Kerala State, India, in the Kolathunad region (present-day Kasaragod and Kannur districts, Mananthavadi taluks of Wayanad, Kozhikode Vadakara and Koilandi taluks). Kerala State is a living form of worship with thousands of years of traditions, rituals and customs. As such, it covers almost all the castes and castes of the Hindu religion in the region. Theyam performers are from the indigenous tribal community and have a prominent place in theyam. It is unique because only in Kerala, upper caste Brahmins and lower castes share an important place in a major form of worship. The word Theyam means Devam or God. is an evil form. In these districts, Theiyat himself is considered as God and they seek blessings from this Theiyam. A similar ritual known as Bhuta Kola is followed in Tulunad in neighboring Karnataka.

 

PHOTOS  SREE RAJ NILESHWAR

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